Oct 16, 2018

No tables needed, the latest advancements of KSQL

In this presentation, Neil Buesing demonstrates various joining and windowing of Kafka Streams, and showcases the lastest KSQL features. This includes joins without KTables and user-defined functions. Neil is the Director, real-time data for Object Partners, Inc. (OPI). With over 18 years of experience at OPI, Neil had and is leading software development projects for e-commerce, insurance, and healthcare industries. Neil’s current development focus is around the use of Apache Kafka for microservice communication along with legacy database integration.

Original slides here, code here.

About the Author

Neil Buesing profile.

Neil Buesing

VP - Streaming Technologies

Neil has more than twenty-five years of Object-Oriented development experience, with twenty years in Java/J2EE application development. He has successfully delivered in the role of an architect and as lead developer.

Over the past 2 years, he has lead up the Real-Time Data Practice at Object Partners. He is a Kafka Architect, Developer, and Advocate presenting at multiple Kafka Summits and Meetups.

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