Feb 1, 2016

Building Continuous Delivery: Rock-solid builds with Gradle

Continuous delivery is the very first principle behind the Agile Manifesto, and yet it continues to plague software development teams. In this talk, David Norton will give a brief overview of continuous delivery practices and then focus on the area that engineers have the most control over: the build phase. Learn about continuous delivery in the light of source control, dependency management, and automated testing strategies. Go back to work with the confidence that you will be able to improve delivery practices on your own team! Gradle will be used in the examples but the principles will work for Maven and other tools as well.

Original code and slides.

About the Author

David Norton profile.

David Norton

Director, Platform Engineering

Passionate about continuous delivery, cloud-native architecture, DevOps, and test-driven development.Passionate about continuous delivery, cloud-native architecture, DevOps, and test-driven development.

  • Experienced in cloud infrastructure technologies such as Terraform, Kubernetes, Docker, AWS, and GCP.
  • Background heavy in enterprise JVM technologies such as Groovy, Spring, Spock, Gradle, JPA, Jenkins.
  • Focus on platform transformation, continuous delivery, building agile teams and high-scale applications.

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