Mar 24, 2015

Goodbye Google Code

Google Code is shutting down (because everyone uses github anyway)

So long and thanks for all the fish.  It has been a good ride — thank you for pushing open collaboration forward!

Its been a good transition to git. If you haven’t yet, consider using git as an SVN client with git-svn.  I recommend this a great way to get your feet wet.

Google Code has a good guide on how to export to git located here: https://code.google.com/p/support/wiki/ExportingToGit

Ok, now what?

How do I move my code from google code (svn) to github? You are in luck, git-svn is here to the rescue.

Cloning your project is a simple one-liner away!

git svn clone -s http://some_app.googlecode.com/svn/

This will download all of the commits and create a new git repository containing all of your history!

The -s (short for –stdlayout) flag is telling git-svn to use the standard layout (meaning that it knows how to interpret the trunk/branches/tags roots in git.)

svnrepo/
├── branches
├── tags
└── trunk

You can customize this if you have a non-standard layout with additional flags check the documentation for more details: man git-svn

 -T<trunk_subdir>
 --trunk=<trunk_subdir>
 -t<tags_subdir>
 --tags=<tags_subdir>
 -b<branches_subdir>
 --branches=<branches_subdir>

From here you can just create a new repo in github and push it!  Checkout github’s docs on doing this.  They also have a decent guide on importing projects into github.

… Or just use the Export to Github button … that google code just added.

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